Monday, January 30, 2017

Ironic Christianity

Via Steve Sailer I see a New York Times headline that would have defied understanding before the ascendance of Current Year thinking:

 

I've heard the claims that Christians are being discriminated against in the refugee racket and have no idea if it is true. The Times:
But the claim is simply untrue. In 2016, the United States admitted almost as many Christian refugees (37,521) as Muslim refugees (38,901), according to the Pew Research Center. 
Which might actually suggest a favoring of Christians over Muslims--Christians make up only five percent of Syrians, for example, according to the cited Pew article (but only one percent of refugees from there). But without the total numbers of Muslim v Christian applicants and corresponding percentages of those accepted, none of this proves anything about discrimination. And I suspect the percentage of applicants from persecuted Christian minorities far outstrips that of Muslim majority populations.
Also, asylees--those who enter the US on their own and then seek asylum--aren't counted. The Pew article doesn't give any of that detail, and the NYT is plainly uninterested, intent on spinning the story as a fact-check on Trump.

But it seems to me the salient point is the Christians are persecuted by Muslims, and the Muslims are persecuted by other Muslims (and of course Christians are far more likely to be genuinely persecuted and not economic migrants posing as refugees). Furthermore the Christians are a tiny minority, genuinely in danger of being wiped out completely--the stated intention of radical Muslims--and the prevention of genocide is supposed to be what the refugee system is for. I suspect as Assad has managed to avert losing control of Syria Christians there are less likely to apply, but Christian communities outside of Assad-controlled Syrian and throughout the Middle East are probably seeking asylum en masse.

It would just be nice to be able to trust our media regarding this. Alas. As for Trump, his championing of Christian refugees distinguishes him from the Times et al in that he seeks to restore to us a semblance of our identity--by allowing us to frankly discriminate in favor of our own, as people the world over not yet under the yoke of hostile elites still do. The Christians are better than the Muslims, they are better for us (if we're to take in anyone) and they are in an important sense, above all, us. 
Globalization is about nothing so much as denying us--historic Western peoples--our point of view, our identity, our sense of us.

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